OSSTF/FEESO Education Forum Vol. 47, Issue 2

The latest issue of Education Forum is now available at education-forum.ca. This issue includes articles and features on topics important to teachers, education workers, and everyone involved in public education. You can also follow Education Forum on Twitter—@EditorEdForum or like us on Facebook—@EducationForum. As usual, we hope you enjoy this issue’s articles. Feel free to share them with friends and colleagues. Below you will find quick-links to just three of the many excellent articles in our most recent issue.


Full issue Education Forum spring 2021, Vol. 47, Issue 2


Highlights:

OSSTF/FEESO president-elect, Karen Littlewood

On March 14, 2021, the Annual Meeting of the Provincial Assembly (AMPA), held virtually, elected Karen Littlewood as the 67th president of the Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation (OSSTF/FEESO). Education Forum editor, Tracey Germa recently had the opportunity to speak with our president-elect to ask her about her story, her trajectory, and her vision for the future. Karen is ready to take the Federation forward, to embrace the changes we hope to make, and to build our organization’s strength in the labour movement. Read more


La présidente élue d’OSSTF/FEESO, Karen Littlewood

Le 14 mars 2021, la Réunion annuelle de l’Assemblée provinciale (RAAP), tenue virtuellement, a élue Karen Littlewood au poste de 67e présidente de la Fédération des enseignantes-enseignants des écoles secondaires de l’Ontario (OSSTF/FEESO). La rédactrice en chef de Education Forum, Tracey Germa, a récemment eu l’occasion de s’entretenir avec notre présidente élue, afin de lui demander de partager son histoire, sa trajectoire et sa vision de l’avenir. Karen est prête à faire avancer la Fédération, à s’ouvrir aux changements que nous espérons apporter et à renforcer notre organisme au sein du mouvement syndical. Lisez davantage.


Black labour activism and the fight for racial justice

In this article, Janelle Brady, Founding Advisor of Progress Toronto recounts the power of Black labour activism in the history of Canadian workers’ rights. She identifies the history of systemic anti-Black racism in Canada and situates it in the context of current Black labour activism, noting that, “Black labour activists have often tied their union organizing to community organizing. The two are interconnected and where community organizing is often seen as illegitimate, this has been central to the Black Canadian experience.” The article provides a rich account of the impact of Black labour activism on the larger labour movement, noting that the work of these activists has led to some of Canada’s earliest anti-discrimination laws. Read more


Activisme syndical Noir et lutte en faveur de la justice sociale

Dans cet article, Janelle Brady, conseillère fondatrice de Progress Toronto nous parle du pouvoir de l’activisme syndical Noir dans l’histoire des droits des travailleuses et des travailleurs au Canada. Elle identifie l’histoire du racisme anti-noir systémique au Canada et le situe dans le contexte de l’activisme syndical Noir actuel, notant que, « Les activistes syndicaux Noirs ont souvent joint leur organisation syndicale à l’organisation communautaire. Ces deux éléments sont liés l’un à l’autre et, bien que l’organisation communautaire est souvent perçue comme étant illégitime, elle a été primordiale à l’expérience des Noirs au Canada. » L’article présente un riche portrait de l’impact de l’activisme syndical Noir sur le mouvement syndical plus vaste, notant que le travail de ces activistes a entraîné la création de certaines des premières lois antidiscriminatoires au Canada. Lisez davantage.


I-dentity—Exploring African identity as a post-secondary student in Canada

Writing as an African, Kenyan who moved to Peterborough, Ontario to study International Development at Trent University, Wacera W. Muriuki cites her experiences of colonialism in the face of her African identity. She identifies the ways in which her own identity affirmation as a Black woman in a predominately white community has empowered her. Citing research on British Cultural Imperialism and mixing it with personal stories, Wacera creates a powerful statement for claiming and proclaiming one’s true self without reservation. She notes, “Regardless of how you choose to affirm your identity, the bottom line remains the same, seek to understand the voice in your head that tells you to ‘tone down’ and in so doing, show up as your most powerful self—however that may look for you.” Read more

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